uropean Shiitakes in the making
The Shiitake has its roots in the far East, mostly in Japan, Korea and China. In those countries, this most fragrant mushroom is being sold in all supermarkets and holds a market share larger than the White Button Mushroom. Due to this fact, it is the world’s second most produced mushroom. 
In Europe, however, the mushroom market is heavily dominated by the White Button Mushroom, which accounts for 97% of all production. But Mycelia has a mission: people should have access to many mushroom species and the most important one of those is the Shiitake.
The Shiitake market in Europe has a number of peculiarities. First, the consumer has a different approach to what a Shiitake should look like. If Japanese consumers prefer mushrooms with large scales or a flower structure on the cap, European consumers have a liking towards cheaper mushrooms with a firm cap. Second, the production systems are different as a result. Whereas Japanese Shiitakes are grown on logs and synthetic substrates, European Shiitakes are grown on pasteurised substrates and synthetic substrates. 
To cater for this specific market, Mycelia and Limgroup have joined in a research program under the EU-founded CrossRoads2 program as part of Interreg. The goal is to define phenotypation, specifically aimed at the European market demand and with a clear future vision of developing European market strains of Shiitake as a first step of a breeding process.

European Shiitakes in the making 

 The Shiitake has its roots in the far East, mostly in Japan, Korea and China. There, this most fragrant mushroom is being sold in all supermarkets in huge numbers. As a result, it is one of the world’s most popular mushrooms and possibly - depending on the source - the world's most cultivated mushroom species. In Europe, however, the mushroom market is heavily dominated by the White Button Mushroom, which accounts for 97% of all production. But Mycelia has a mission to balance things out!


The Shiitake market in Europe is significantly different from the Asian market. If Japanese consumers prefer mushrooms with large scales or a flower structure on the cap, European consumers have a liking towards cheaper mushrooms with a firm cap. The production systems are different as a result. Whereas Japanese Shiitakes are grown on logs and synthetic substrates, European Shiitakes are grown on pasteurised substrates and synthetic substrates. 


To cater for these specifics, Mycelia and Limgroup have joined in a research program under the EU-founded CrossRoads2 program as part of Interreg. The goal is to define phenotypation, specifically aimed at the European market demand and with a clear future vision of developing European market strains of Shiitake as a first step of a breeding process.

 

Shiitake mushroom

  • CrossRoads2